Adam’s Guide To Buying A Remote Electronic Training Collar

Adam’s Guide To Buying A Remote Electronic Training Collar
(Also referred to as an E-collar)

Below you’ll find the remote electronic training collars that I recommend. It is important that a remote electronic training collar (an “e-collar” for short) have at least the following features:

  • Multiple levels of stimulation (more than three).  You must have the flexibility to adapt the motivation of the stimulation/correction to MATCH your dog’s temperament.  Three levels of stimulation is usually not enough.  Often times, dog owner will find that with the cheaper e-collars that are sold at pet stores, the medium stimulation is too light, but the high stimulation is too motivational.

  • A range that is practical for what you’re training.  Generally speaking, the more range, the better– as most e-collars seldom reach the range that they claim, anyway.  When I recommend an electronic remote collar to personal friends, I usually suggest that they purchase one that has a one mile range, if money is not an issue.  If not, then get one of the others I recommend below and you should still probably be alright in most instances.  And if you’re just planning on using the e-collar for behavior modification issues around the house or for specific aggression issues… then the range on the electronic remote collar is really a non-issue.

  • The transmitter should be small enough to carry in your pocket.

  • The manufacturer should prove itself to be in business for the long run.  This is evident by excellent product support and a willingness to stand behind it’s product.

  • The remote electronic training collar should have intelligent engineering.  Some e-collars demonstrate a noticeable lag time from when you press the button to when the dog feels the stimulation… and so your timing (and the dog’s association) will suffer.  And this means that your training results will suffer, too.  The e-collars that I recommend below do not have this “stimulation lag.” Early in my dog training career, I thought I could save some money by using the cheap e-collars made in China and Korea.  I have three words to sum up my experience: JUNK, JUNK, JUNK!  Let me tell you one thing about e-collar training:  When you press the button, your dog MUST receive the stimulation.  E-collars that are poorly engineered will pick up other transmissions and accidentally shock your dog.  Or they will not work when you need them to.  But you will not run into such problems if you purchase a quality product from a top e-collar manufacturer.  (I recommend Dogtra, Innotek or Tri-Tronics.)

If used correctly and intelligently, these collars are safe and will not harm you or your dog.  Like any training tool, emphasis is placed on their correct and intelligent use.  Remember… even a nylon leash can be harmful if you attach it to the wrong end of the dog.





— Adam Katz, Author of “Secrets of a Professional Dog Trainer!

(Please note: Model numbers change frequently.  Check with your preferred vendor to find the same or similar collars):

I’m currently using the Sit Means Sit e-collar by Sportdog.  You can buy the same e-collar that I’m using from your local Sit Means Sit franchisee.

The e-collars below are also excellent.  I’ve used them and continue to recommend them, although the model numbers have changed since originally publishing this page:


Dogtra 2000NC– This collar has a one mile range and both the collar and transmitter are waterproof.

  • Easy to use
  • Waterproof transmitter and collar
  • Adjust the level desired at the hand-held transmitter starting from a “zero” level graduating up to the necessary level in a linear progression (no steps or increments)
    using patented ” rheostat dial”.
  • Both “Nick” & “Constant” stimulation
  • Rechargeable Ni-MH batteries
  • 1 mile range
  • No external antenna on the collar
  • Available in a two dog model
  • U.S. Patents

This is a very powerful e-collar.  “Constant” Stimulation gives you plenty of stopping power and the “Nick” is mild but motivating.

The dial on the transmitter allows you to change the strength of the collar even as you are working the dog.

Dogtra 2000NC


Dogtra 1100NC– This collar has a 1/2 mile range and just the collar is waterproof.

  • WATERPROOF HOUSING – The dog’s collar is waterproof, the transmitter is water – resistant.
  • NON-CLUMSY FEEL – Ergonomic transmitter weigh 4.2 oz. – 3.1″ x 1.6″ x 1.0″
  • NON-EXPOSED ANTENNA – The dog’s collar weight 4.9 oz. – 2.75″ x 1.75″ x 1.4″
  • EFFECTIVE RANGE – Very efficient 1/2 mile penetration power
  • GLOVE-USE BUTTONS – A no-look feel during inclement weather
  • CONVENIENT LANYARD – Assists in keeping hands free for other activities
  • POSITIVE-ACTION” TURN-ON/OFF SWITCH – No chance for the dog’s collar to accidentally turn off while in the field
  • ONE CHARGER SYSTEM – Charges both the trainer’s transmitter and the dog’s collar – lasts up to one week plus with everyday use between recharge

The 1100NC – designed to “Go where dogs go” – superior results are achieved in two very important ways.

  • The necessary kind of electrical stimulation designed for rapidly moving, rambunctious dogs
  • A means to adjust the level of stimulation from a “zero” setting graduating upward to the necessary level and then downward in a linear progression using our patented “rheostat dial” design. (Priced to please while providing our new e-linear Training System.)

This collar offers features of the 1200 but at a price savings for those trainers whose needs are filled with a water resistant transmitter (vs. a water-proof transmitter).

“It took me awhile to figure out the difference between the 1100NC and the 1200NC that Dogtra offers.  For a price difference of fifty bucks, the only main difference is that the transmitter (the part you hold in your hand) is water resistant vs. water-proof).  Unless you’re into water sports, it’s not worth the extra fifty bucks, in my opinion so we’re just carrying this model for now.
— Adam.

Dogtra 1100NC


Dogtra 175NCP– This collar is designed specifically for ANY size dog
(including small breeds).

175NCP (Low to mid-range power unit)
The 175NCP is an entry-level companion dog trainer for small, medium or large breeds. This compact trainer has a 400-yard range, nick and constant stimulation modes along with Dogtra’s patented non-stimulating pager function. Features a durable waterproof receiver, water-resistant transmitter and rechargeable Ni-MH batteries.

Dogtra 175NCP

Below is the new Dogtra e-collar I’m currently using for my personal dog. (This was written back in 2008. Still a great e-collar, though…
and I’ve never had a problem with the batteries losing their memory)
It works quite well for the type of training environment I’m working in.
(Relative close-in distances and park settings.)

Dogtra 200NCP

The new 200NCP Gold bridges the gap between our popular pet trainers and our Pro line. It incorporates many of the features as our Pro-series at a more affordable price.

Features include water-resistant transmitter/waterproof receiver, half-mile range nick/constant stimulation and our patented non-stimulating pager mode along with Dogtra’s industry-leading durability. Rechargeable Ni-MH Batteries.

Dogtra 200NCP Gold

Dogtra 202NCP Gold (2-Dog Unit)


Recently, I have also been playing around with the Sit Means Sit Remote Electronic collar, by Sportdog… which I like a lot, too.

2 thoughts on “Adam’s Guide To Buying A Remote Electronic Training Collar”

  1. My first e-collar was a name brand one but was a lower priced model.It had a 100 yard range with eight stimulation settings. It did not have rechargeable batteries and to change the settings you have to remove the back cover. I was constantly buying batteries for the transmitter and receiver. My dog would also get out of range from at times. My next e-collar had a 400 yard range rechargeable batteries and eight stimulation settings that could be changed with the touch of a dial. This one was a little more expensive model but made my training experience easier. I believe when purchasing an e-collar you get what you pay for.

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